Thursday, July 28, 2011

Basic Sewing: How to read a pattern tutorial-PART 2

AnnaVirginia Fashion: How to read a pattern - PATTERNS

 You are at Part 2.  Follow links to access Part 1 and Part 3.

Pattern Instructions and Pieces:

Notions and Fabric to Buy: A list of types of fabrics that work with pattern. A list of notions needed (ex: zipper, elastic, lace, ribbon, etc.). A list of quantity of fabric (and lining and interfacing) based on body measurements
AnnaVirginia Fashion: How to read a pattern - PATTERNS

· Front and Back images – Shows a drawing of what each finished garment will look like from front (bigger images) and back (smaller images)
AnnaVirginia Fashion: How to read a pattern - PATTERNS

· Pattern pieces – images on instructions that explain which pieces will need to be cut from paper depending on which pattern you are doing (ex: which pieces go with style D)
AnnaVirginia Fashion: How to read a pattern - PATTERNS

· Cutting Layout – indicates recommended placement of pattern pieces on fabric when you’re ready to start cutting out the fabric.
AnnaVirginia Fashion: How to read a pattern - PATTERNS

· Cutting line – Different lines indicate cut for a different size (stated on the lines)
AnnaVirginia Fashion: How to read a pattern - PATTERNS

· Seam Line – Typically 5/8th inch from the cutting line, unless otherwise specified in pattern directions
· Hem Line – Fabric folded on itself (folded twice to enclose raw edge) at points where fabric end is not connected to another pattern piece (ex: ankle of pants, cuff on simple sleeve, bottom edge of skirt, etc.)
· Grain line – This line needs to be exactly parallel to the selvage
AnnaVirginia Fashion: How to read a pattern - PATTERNS

· Fold line – Indicates where fold of fabric needs to line up
AnnaVirginia Fashion: How to read a pattern - PATTERNS

· Notches – Triangles that you cut outside of pattern so that you can match up separate pieces when preparing to sew
AnnaVirginia Fashion: How to read a pattern - PATTERNS

· Dots – Points of interest that are explained in each pattern (ex: where to stop sewing for zipper opening, where to place corners of pocket piece, dart sewing start and stop, etc)
AnnaVirginia Fashion: How to read a pattern - PATTERNS

NEXT: Basic Sewing: How to read a pattern tutorial-PART 3
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Paper Heart Camera: How to Make a Blog Button Grab Box

Need to make a blog button? This site has been the best help!

Paper Heart Camera: How to Make a Blog Button Grab Box:
"When I first made a button for my blog it took me FOREVER to figure out how to do the html code to get a snazzy little grab box underneath i..."

Sunday, July 24, 2011

Basic Sewing: How to read a pattern tutorial–PART 1

AnnaVirginia Fashion: How to read a pattern - FABRIC

You are at Part 1.  Follow links to access Part 2 and Part 3.

Fabric:

AnnaVirginia Fashion: How to read a pattern - FABRIC

· Selvage – Finished edge of fabric.

· Bias – Diagonal direction on fabric becomes vertical line on finished garment. Adds stretch and beautiful drape.

· Nap - Pattern pieces often require the “nap” to be in the same direction, or cut with the “right side facing. Paying attention to nap will avoid having “upside down” fabric in finished garment. *ex: directional prints, velvet.
AnnaVirginia Fashion: How to read a pattern - FABRIC


· Interfacing: An iron-on or sew-on fabric that adds weight and stiffness.
AnnaVirginia Fashion: How to read a pattern - FABRIC


· Lining: Lightweight fabric that goes on the inside of the garment to hide stitching and can add weight.

NEXT: Basic Sewing: How to read a pattern tutorial-PART 2
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Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Christmas in July Sale

Welcome to my Christmas in July Sale!  

I'm offering 40% off of all my Ready-Made items (does not include crochet patterns).  This means that you get the best price and quickest shipping combined - what a deal!  Follow this link to find all of the items in my sale: Click Here.



Monday, July 11, 2011

My New and Imrpoved Website

I've been working a lot this past week or so on my website (www.annavirginiafashion.com) to help make it better!

It's prettier, easier to navigate (I hope), and has more of my items to show!  Please visit it and let me know what you think!

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Featured Art Work from Etsy Sellers

Etsy has a business connection with West Elm, a company that makes home decor and home fabrics.  In their more recent catalogs, West Elm has featured art in their studios from Etsy sellers.  What a compliment to be featured there!

I've found my own top picks from other Etsy Sellers.  If I were able to buy prints for my home, this is what you'd see on display!
Retro Elephant and Butterfly by nommon

Girl with Red Balloon by maybematilda
Busy Bee by SCPerkins
Belle of the Ball by lauratrevey
Niagara Falls in the Night by TimeCaptured
Custom Wedding Dress Painting by laurenspaintpalette

Saturday, July 2, 2011

How to Use 5 Etsy Listing Photos

How is the best way to use your 5 photos-per-item in your Etsy shop?

Your first picture is the "Front Page" picture.  It's the photo shown in shop listings and search results.  A good photo here will open the door to your shop!  Focus this picture on the item itself, or (depending on the type of item) get a close-up on a detail of the item. Etsy's administrative team, buyers, and sellers love for this picture to be stunning, ethereal, and compelling.
The Koi by Lush Boutique



Multi Colored Tutu from Slade Made

The easiest way to get good lighting on a tight budget or limited resources is to be out on a sunny day. However, having the item in direct sunlight will over-expose its color, so find a spot with sufficient light, but in the shade. I don't recommend the shade of a tree, though, because trees let little bits of sunshine through that make it hard for a camera to focus. Just find a spot outdoors in shade and click-away!

If you are running into the problem of cloudy days, rainy days, etc., Etsy has suggestions on taking photos in other conditions here (“I prefer to photograph outside, but it’s often too dark or raining. Help!” Low-light or dull days don’t have to equal dull photographs. Excellent photography doesn't have to be bright.).


The rest of your photos should show some detail, such as (depending on your type of product):
  • Size
  • Proportion
  • Suggestions for use
  • Customizing ideas or options
  • Other angles or views (ie: inside of a purse)


The Princeton by Cherry Blossoms

Red Vine Utensil Holder by Magnolia Pottery

Golden Yellow Zinnia Gemston Flower by Shmanessa8 Flowers

Aqua Blue Dahlia Surgical Steel Stud Earrings by Just Enough Style

Classic Black Vintage 1960s Leather Mary Jane Pumps Heels Shoes 8 from Sassy Sister Vintage

Depending on the item, you may have a few picture slots leftover. At this point, it's customary to use a Team Badge. Members of the LDS Members of Etsy have a Team Badge, which can be copied from the image below. Save it to your hard drive and upload it to your pictures.  Teams are a great way to network, advertise your fellow team members, and/or just show that you're involve in Etsy communities.