Monday, December 12, 2011

Baseball Baseball Hat

DSCN6695Hehe, what a cute idea!  I must admit, though, that it wasn’t mine.  A customer of mine had seen something on Pinterest and wanted to have me do it for her.  She ordered one of my Baby Boy Brimmed Baseball Hats and she wanted two red stripes that look like a baseball.

I schemed and came up with an idea.  I found pictures of baseballs and I even found a couple of photos of other yarn hats that had a baseball-type detail.  I made the hat, and then I stretched that hat over my baby’s head so I could show you everyone what it looks like before I mailed it off.  They are nighttime pictures, so they aren’t the best – But, you can still tell that it’s adorable!

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Order your own custom hat here: http://www.etsy.com/listing/80603178/crochet-baby-boy-baseball-hat-custom

Or purchase my pattern and make your own: http://www.etsy.com/listing/86844398/pattern-brimmed-baby-boy-hat-pdf-crochet

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Sunday, December 4, 2011

Flower Petal Tutu *Tutorial*

AnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower Tutu
I’ve been making tutus like this for little girls in my neighborhood.  They have a Christmas dance performance coming up, and this is what their teacher wanted them to have!
They are so cute and easy, I thought I’d share how to make them.  Aside from your regular supplies (thread, pins, sewing machine, electricity), here is what you’ll need:
     *1 yard of Tulle (usually sold by 55” wide)
     *Flower Petals (bridal section of the craft store)     
     *Elastic (somewhere between 3/8” to 1” wide… up to you)
     *Satin Blanket Seam Binding (found near thread, notions in the craft store)
AnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower Tutu
Now that you have your supplies, you can begin!
Read the full step before you complete it.  Also, look at the pictures (and click to enlarge) to help you understand what I’m explaining – it’s hard when I can’t explain in person.  Leave comments if you have any questions, and I’ll reply asap!
1. Take your yard of tulle, and fold it lengthwise (“hot dog style,” or opposite of how they cut it in the store).  This will make a long, skinny piece.
Measure the girl who will be wearing the tutu for length.  I suggest measuring from the waistline to just above the knees.  You can do however short or long that you would like, though.  Mark desired length on tutu.
Sew along the long side of the tulle.  Cut off excess fabric.  This seam will be parallel to the fold.
AnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower Tutu

2.  Fold the Tulle inside of itself.  This means that the two raw, open edges will be lined up together.  Sew the raw edges together, but leave an opening of about 5 inches (big enough for you hand to fit through).  Backstitch at both ends to reinforce. 
AnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower Tutu

3.  Insert your hand into the opening that you left, and pull the tulle out.  This means that instead of having a tube parallel to the long seam, the tube will be parallel to the short seam. (Or, instead of opening side-to-side, it will now open up-and-down)
After the tube is correct, use the same hole to fill tulle with the flower petals.  Fill as full or thin as you like.  Fold and sew the gap closed.
AnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower Tutu

4. Measure out the satin binding.  I recommend measuring the hips and adding 3 inches.  That will also give them room to grow, but it’s really up to you how big you want to do it.
Take the two raw ends and sew together.
Satin binding is nice, because the long edge is already finished, so you won’t need to worry about hemming it.
AnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower Tutu

5.  Baste the tulle around where the waist will be (same as the first hemline that you sewed – see step 1).   Leave strings long enough to gather in the basting to match circumference to that of the satin binding.
Line up the vertical hems of the satin binding and tulle.  Pin around to make sure that it’s lined up, equal length and hiding the horizontal seam.  Sew satin binding to the tulle, but leave a 3 inch gap.  Back stitch at both ends to reinforce stitching.
To remind me to leave the gap, I put two pins at the “start” point and at the “finish” point.  I don’t sew between the two (for now).
AnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower Tutu

6.  Measure the elastic.  You can do this two ways – first, you can measure the elastic as compared to the satin binding.  Stretch the elastic as wide as you can to match the length of the binding.  Cut 1 inch longer than measured.  Or, you can stretch the elastic around the girl’s waist.  Make sure it’s not too tight or too loose.  You don’t want it to fall off, but you also don’t want her to suffocate!
Attach a safety pin to the end of the elastic, and push it through the opening of the satin binding.  Pin the other end near the opening, so that you don’t lose the elastic!  Pull the elastic all the way through.  Make sure it isn’t twisted, then sew the ends together.  I sew back and forth a few times, because elastic gets tugged on a lot.
Sew the gap closed on the satin binding, back stitching at both ends.
AnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower Tutu

Rosette:
Using the some of the extra tulle, I decided to add a rosette to the tutus.  I thought it was a cute way to add more of the color to the tutu without spending any extra money (and using leftovers that I had any way!).
Here’s how to make one:
AnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower Tutu
AnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower Tutu
Take a long, skinny piece of tulle (about 3 inches wide by 18 to 24 inches long) and roll it together, as shown (the camera didn’t want to focus on the tulle, sorry).
Take a needle with thread (I did tread that matched the satin binding’s color), and sew through the rosette about two inches below the top of the rosette.  I poked it through a couple of times.
The, place the rosette in the desired place on the satin binding of the tutu, and sew.  Using these stitches to secure to binding and to also hide raw end of rosette. Tie off.
AnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower TutuAnnaVirginia Fashion: Flower Tutu

And it’s all done!  Try it on your little girl!  I’ll see if my toddler can hold still long enough for me to get a picture of her wearing her tutu.